Wednesday, 9 April 2014

A-Z Challenge 2014: H is for Half-Baptised

www.a-to-zchallenge.com
This is definitely 'back to basics' - it has to do with when people were born!  Sometimes genealogists will be confused because they see that a baby was christened (with a note of 'half-baptised' next to the entry), but then appears with a different date in the baptismal registers, accompanied by 'received into the church' or 'privately baptised' in the margin next to the entry.

Here is why:  if a baby was so sickly it was thought that it would die, the midwife was given permission to baptise the child there and then.  If the baby did actually survive, then later it might be recorded in the registers as being 'received into the church'.  It was important to certain faiths that a child be baptised so that its immortal soul could be saved (and it could be buried in consecrated ground).

8 comments:

  1. That's really good information. I haven't done much with genealogy. I started some family research while evaluating databases the library system I work for was thinking of buying. It was fun and I want to learn more.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, there's always plenty to learn! (and I am still learning after 30+ years). Please dive in and start researching - you'll be glad you did. Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  2. Very interesting. I have never come across "half baptized" in any of my genealogical research. I would have never thought of a midwife baptizing a child before. It's amazing what you come across in genealogy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know. I have found some weird-and-wonderful things along the way. Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  3. Fascinating stuff and all new to me - I have seen privately baptised and wondered if this was because they were visiting away from their normal church when the baby arrived!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, one thing I have learned over the years is never to say 'this is definitely WHY', because our ancestors seem to take delight in being the 'exception to the rule' sometimes. Sigh. Just when you thought you had it all worked out...

      Thanks for stopping by

      Delete
  4. I often found that they may have given more importance to baptismal certificates than actual births. The info I have from my mom has marriages and baptismal but no death or birth.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, it really depends on what date you are looking at. In the UK, civil registration (like birth certificates) only began in 1837. So, if your mom's research went further back - there were only church records (like baptisms and burials) anyway.

      Thanks for stopping by

      Delete

Blog Archive

Copyright

You may NOT use the contents of this site for commercial purposes without explicit written permission from the author and blog owner. Commercial purposes includes blogs with ads and income generating features, and/or blogs or sites using feed content as a replacement for original content. Full content usage is not permitted.

You Might Also Be Interested In

Total Pageviews